, WETHEURBAN

FASHION: A Conversation with ‘FALL’ Founder & Designer Jeremy Fall

A little over two years ago when WeTheUrban was in its infancy, I had the unique pleasure of meeting someone who would soon prove to not just be a game changing creative, but one of the hardest working most inspiring people I have ever worked with. 

Back then, LA-based Jeremy Fall, was running Cliche magazine. Fast forward to now - a lot of creative projects, blood, sweat, and tears later, he has now launched the first collection of his new fashion brand, FALL, and it’s actually quite fucking good! Peep my interview with the creative after the jump as we discuss the come up, fashion, passion, and everything in-between…

Willie Greene: So to start off.. I guess you and I have a lot in common in regards to starting our hustle at such young ages. I know you’ve dabbled in a bunch of different creative fields. When did you realize you wanted to become a designer?

Jeremy Fall: Absolutely. It’s good to chat with you again, I remember when we first met and both were running our magazines. I’ve been wanting to start a line since I was ten years old but never felt like it was the right time. I had an epiphany at a creative meeting last November of 2012 when I realized that fashion was the perfect route for me pursue. It was the first time that I had seen it as nothing more than an art form, excluding the commercialized aspect of it that we see everywhere today.

WG: Yes! You were actually one of the few people in the start of my journey that played a pretty integral part in just always being there happy to help and also in simply believing in myself/my work. Regarding your new brand, this epiphany you mentioned is interesting. Can you tell me a little about the art from and the process of creating your first collection? Was it tough or what you expected?

JF: Well thank you, man. That’s always good to hear. I strongly believe in supporting other artists and hard workers around me. It’s great to see what you’ve turned WeTheUrban into and it means a lot to be doing this interview with you years later.

As far as my brand, I realized that fashion was the perfect art form for me because it was a way for me to actually see my emotions through a visual. Fashion, before anything, is a form of self expression. I’m not talking about designers but everyone in general. It’s what we use to scream without having to breathe a single world. When you’re in a sad mood, you tend to dress down. When you feel good or want to feel good, you dress up and take time to create an outfit. On the designer side, I love the idea of being able to convey what I’m feeling through pieces that other people will interpret in their own way when they pair it with other pieces. In a strange way, it’s a way of seeing your emotions travel through other people’s experiences.

This first collection conveys a lot of emotion, I started it when I was going through a rough patch in my life both personally and professionally. Professionally, the transition from 100% business in the past year to creative was rather difficult at first in my thought process because I was thinking very linearly and through specific actions and algorithms. Creativity is the complete opposite. You have to be able to do shit that doesn’t make sense to anyone else in the world. There’s no right or wrong, no black or white. It’s just you, and whether or not people like it, it doesn’t matter in the end as long as it’s just you. The process was extremely tough at first, but once I understood that I could literally just create what I was feeling, it all started falling into place after that. I tend to see a lot of things through a darker lens. Not in a negative or depressing way, I just like going straight to the raw part of emotions and situations in my life, and that’s what I convey through my line overall, and through this collection. 

WG: I totally understand. A lot of successful streetwear/fashion brands came up during downturns. Supreme and Bape are great examples. We don’t have to get into specifics about your rough patch, but do you almost feel like it was necessary in order for you to achieve what you have today? Also want to pick your brain about your thoughts on trying to ‘come up’ and stand out when the industry is almost too over saturated right now.

JF: It was definitely necessary for me to achieve what I have today. Truthfully, I could have created a collection that I thought was cool and that other people might have liked as well, but it wouldn’t have been the same. I don’t want to look back at my last few months of creative work and have the result feel empty. I think it’s more of a personal achievement than a design achievement. What resonates to me when I look at our look book or the collection is what makes that rough patch worth it. I also strongly believe that the lesson learned and different vision I have of life now is worth so much more than any form of pain.

Honestly, I don’t think there’s really a cheat sheet to stand out today. I think that technology is today’s biggest advantage and disadvantage. The amazing part is that tech and social media have given everyone in our generation a voice, which is extraordinary. Everyone can speak, share their passions, thoughts, emotions and communicate across the world within seconds. It’s amazing, especially in an ideal world. The problem is, it’s conditioned us to consume a lot of bullshit and we’re slowly losing the ability to filter and think for ourselves. With that said, I believe that anyone can really stand out, you just have to figure out how to be louder than the rest of the noise. You have to understand what the world wants and go completely against it. Because truthfully, the only things that lasts nowadays are those that are different from the start, stick to their roots, and grow slowly. It’s a game of patience and quality now, most people are going for high numbers and no substance. Our era is going to slowly strive away from all the sex tapes and commercial Internet wonders because it’s driving everyone to emptiness. If you’re a leader in passion, people will catch on.  9:14 PM

Look at you for example, you still have the same passion and drive from when I first met you. I know what it’s like to run a magazine, it’s masochism, yet you’re still doing it. But even with all the blows you’ve encountered, you’re still here staying up to have this conversation with me. You care about the message you’re sending out to people and the voice you’re conveying it through. You could have interviewed a commercial sensation that’d drive thousands of hits to your site but you chose not to. That’s quality to me. 

WG: Well thank you for the kind words! Preach. I couldn’t agree more with your comment on longevity in the industry. I definitely feel like the internet is conditioning my generation to heap loads of bullshit. Case in point: why WeTheUrban’s issues don’t have a real set circulation time. The further we dive into the digital the more we’re losing the idea of quality over quantity. 

But back back to your new brand and aesthetics/concepts. If we were all blind, how would you describe your clothes?

JF: From a purely aesthetic standpoint, my pieces are usually predominantly black, asymmetrical, with some unfinished and raw accents. The shapes are usually longer and some have drape to them. In terms of fabrics, I like to use a lot of leather and soft materials. I like to picture people wearing all black when they have them on and completely stick out without needing any sort of flash. The goal when I make most of my pieces is to create them in a way that’s open to interpretation. By that I mean, one person could wear a a leather piece as a vest for example, yet another might have a way to reverse it and tie it around their waist as a skirt. I love to give people pieces that they can wear in different ways depending on how they feel at that moment.

WG: Being a startup of sorts/independent fashion label obviously has its challenges. Let’s envision life a year from now… what fashion/business goals will you hope to have achieved by then? What do you hope your consumers see when they’re first attracted to your brand? 

JF: Honestly, my goal at the end of this whole journey is to make people feel something. I’ve always said that I want people to either fall in love with my line or hate it. I really believe that that’s the only way to truly make an impact in the world, there’s no room for indifference anymore. I want my consumers to see and understand that the line is backed by passion and actual real people, not a machine. FALL isn’t led by a group of suits in a conference room that calculate trends and attempt to maximize sales. We’re an extremely small team of passionate people trying to convey a message and build a culture around our brand and it’s designs. I want people to not only see that but feel it too the second they discover us. 

As far as long term goals, it’s difficult to tell at this point. My main goal as of now would definitely be to have a brand that has grown organically over time yet still maintains the same ethos as day one. It’s so easy to get lost nowadays with everything going on in the world, I just want to support and maintain the respect of other artists and people who matter. Like I mentioned earlier, I didn’t start this venture in order to make everyone happy. But if I can make other creatives, regardless of the industry, look twice and think “wow, this is fucking awesome”, I’ll consider myself successful. 

WG: Perfect. Lastly, friend to friend. Out of all of the ideas, trails, tribulations, ventures, and everything in between - can you share the one main important thing you’ve learned through all of this?

JF: Truthfully, I’ve learned that passion is everything. It may seem obvious when you hear it, but we tend to forget that in most instances. I’m an idea person as a lot of us are in this world. Ideas fuel my days, cause my sleepless nights, spark my emotions and build my knowledge. I’m an over-thinker and want to create incessantly.

The truth is, out of the millions of ideas I’ve had throughout the years, very few of them I was actually passionate about. Sometimes we try to relate to other’s journeys around us and recreate them through a similar path hoping to find ourselves; but at the end of the day everyone writes their own story. There have never been two identical outcomes in the world. Everyone’s is different. So the only thing that’s left is passion. If you’re not passionate about your journey, it won’t work. You can try convincing yourself that you want to do something as much as you want, but if you don’t actually feel and understand the reasons behind it, it’s not worth pursuing. You’ll always end up finding that one passion. The one that’s worth the battle, the one that’ll make you sink all your sweat and blood into it. And when you do discover it, you’ll just know. That’s what all of this has taught me because I finally found mine.

http://www.borntofall.com

Photographer: Easton Schirra (link to http://www.eastonschirra.com)

Styling: Wilford Lenov

FASHION: A Conversation with ‘FALL’ Founder & Designer Jeremy Fall

A little over two years ago when WeTheUrban was in its infancy, I had the unique pleasure of meeting someone who would soon prove to not just be a game changing creative, but one of the hardest working most inspiring people I have ever worked with. 

Back then, LA-based Jeremy Fall, was running Cliche magazine. Fast forward to now - a lot of creative projects, blood, sweat, and tears later, he has now launched the first collection of his new fashion brand, FALL, and it’s actually quite fucking good! Peep my interview with the creative after the jump as we discuss the come up, fashion, passion, and everything in-between…

Willie Greene: So to start off.. I guess you and I have a lot in common in regards to starting our hustle at such young ages. I know you’ve dabbled in a bunch of different creative fields. When did you realize you wanted to become a designer?

Jeremy Fall: Absolutely. It’s good to chat with you again, I remember when we first met and both were running our magazines. I’ve been wanting to start a line since I was ten years old but never felt like it was the right time. I had an epiphany at a creative meeting last November of 2012 when I realized that fashion was the perfect route for me pursue. It was the first time that I had seen it as nothing more than an art form, excluding the commercialized aspect of it that we see everywhere today.

WG: Yes! You were actually one of the few people in the start of my journey that played a pretty integral part in just always being there happy to help and also in simply believing in myself/my work. Regarding your new brand, this epiphany you mentioned is interesting. Can you tell me a little about the art from and the process of creating your first collection? Was it tough or what you expected?

JF: Well thank you, man. That’s always good to hear. I strongly believe in supporting other artists and hard workers around me. It’s great to see what you’ve turned WeTheUrban into and it means a lot to be doing this interview with you years later.

As far as my brand, I realized that fashion was the perfect art form for me because it was a way for me to actually see my emotions through a visual. Fashion, before anything, is a form of self expression. I’m not talking about designers but everyone in general. It’s what we use to scream without having to breathe a single world. When you’re in a sad mood, you tend to dress down. When you feel good or want to feel good, you dress up and take time to create an outfit. On the designer side, I love the idea of being able to convey what I’m feeling through pieces that other people will interpret in their own way when they pair it with other pieces. In a strange way, it’s a way of seeing your emotions travel through other people’s experiences.

This first collection conveys a lot of emotion, I started it when I was going through a rough patch in my life both personally and professionally. Professionally, the transition from 100% business in the past year to creative was rather difficult at first in my thought process because I was thinking very linearly and through specific actions and algorithms. Creativity is the complete opposite. You have to be able to do shit that doesn’t make sense to anyone else in the world. There’s no right or wrong, no black or white. It’s just you, and whether or not people like it, it doesn’t matter in the end as long as it’s just you. The process was extremely tough at first, but once I understood that I could literally just create what I was feeling, it all started falling into place after that. I tend to see a lot of things through a darker lens. Not in a negative or depressing way, I just like going straight to the raw part of emotions and situations in my life, and that’s what I convey through my line overall, and through this collection. 

WG: I totally understand. A lot of successful streetwear/fashion brands came up during downturns. Supreme and Bape are great examples. We don’t have to get into specifics about your rough patch, but do you almost feel like it was necessary in order for you to achieve what you have today? Also want to pick your brain about your thoughts on trying to ‘come up’ and stand out when the industry is almost too over saturated right now.

JF: It was definitely necessary for me to achieve what I have today. Truthfully, I could have created a collection that I thought was cool and that other people might have liked as well, but it wouldn’t have been the same. I don’t want to look back at my last few months of creative work and have the result feel empty. I think it’s more of a personal achievement than a design achievement. What resonates to me when I look at our look book or the collection is what makes that rough patch worth it. I also strongly believe that the lesson learned and different vision I have of life now is worth so much more than any form of pain.

Honestly, I don’t think there’s really a cheat sheet to stand out today. I think that technology is today’s biggest advantage and disadvantage. The amazing part is that tech and social media have given everyone in our generation a voice, which is extraordinary. Everyone can speak, share their passions, thoughts, emotions and communicate across the world within seconds. It’s amazing, especially in an ideal world. The problem is, it’s conditioned us to consume a lot of bullshit and we’re slowly losing the ability to filter and think for ourselves. With that said, I believe that anyone can really stand out, you just have to figure out how to be louder than the rest of the noise. You have to understand what the world wants and go completely against it. Because truthfully, the only things that lasts nowadays are those that are different from the start, stick to their roots, and grow slowly. It’s a game of patience and quality now, most people are going for high numbers and no substance. Our era is going to slowly strive away from all the sex tapes and commercial Internet wonders because it’s driving everyone to emptiness. If you’re a leader in passion, people will catch on.  9:14 PM

Look at you for example, you still have the same passion and drive from when I first met you. I know what it’s like to run a magazine, it’s masochism, yet you’re still doing it. But even with all the blows you’ve encountered, you’re still here staying up to have this conversation with me. You care about the message you’re sending out to people and the voice you’re conveying it through. You could have interviewed a commercial sensation that’d drive thousands of hits to your site but you chose not to. That’s quality to me. 

WG: Well thank you for the kind words! Preach. I couldn’t agree more with your comment on longevity in the industry. I definitely feel like the internet is conditioning my generation to heap loads of bullshit. Case in point: why WeTheUrban’s issues don’t have a real set circulation time. The further we dive into the digital the more we’re losing the idea of quality over quantity. 

But back back to your new brand and aesthetics/concepts. If we were all blind, how would you describe your clothes?

JF: From a purely aesthetic standpoint, my pieces are usually predominantly black, asymmetrical, with some unfinished and raw accents. The shapes are usually longer and some have drape to them. In terms of fabrics, I like to use a lot of leather and soft materials. I like to picture people wearing all black when they have them on and completely stick out without needing any sort of flash. The goal when I make most of my pieces is to create them in a way that’s open to interpretation. By that I mean, one person could wear a a leather piece as a vest for example, yet another might have a way to reverse it and tie it around their waist as a skirt. I love to give people pieces that they can wear in different ways depending on how they feel at that moment.

WG: Being a startup of sorts/independent fashion label obviously has its challenges. Let’s envision life a year from now… what fashion/business goals will you hope to have achieved by then? What do you hope your consumers see when they’re first attracted to your brand? 

JF: Honestly, my goal at the end of this whole journey is to make people feel something. I’ve always said that I want people to either fall in love with my line or hate it. I really believe that that’s the only way to truly make an impact in the world, there’s no room for indifference anymore. I want my consumers to see and understand that the line is backed by passion and actual real people, not a machine. FALL isn’t led by a group of suits in a conference room that calculate trends and attempt to maximize sales. We’re an extremely small team of passionate people trying to convey a message and build a culture around our brand and it’s designs. I want people to not only see that but feel it too the second they discover us. 

As far as long term goals, it’s difficult to tell at this point. My main goal as of now would definitely be to have a brand that has grown organically over time yet still maintains the same ethos as day one. It’s so easy to get lost nowadays with everything going on in the world, I just want to support and maintain the respect of other artists and people who matter. Like I mentioned earlier, I didn’t start this venture in order to make everyone happy. But if I can make other creatives, regardless of the industry, look twice and think “wow, this is fucking awesome”, I’ll consider myself successful. 

WG: Perfect. Lastly, friend to friend. Out of all of the ideas, trails, tribulations, ventures, and everything in between - can you share the one main important thing you’ve learned through all of this?

JF: Truthfully, I’ve learned that passion is everything. It may seem obvious when you hear it, but we tend to forget that in most instances. I’m an idea person as a lot of us are in this world. Ideas fuel my days, cause my sleepless nights, spark my emotions and build my knowledge. I’m an over-thinker and want to create incessantly.

The truth is, out of the millions of ideas I’ve had throughout the years, very few of them I was actually passionate about. Sometimes we try to relate to other’s journeys around us and recreate them through a similar path hoping to find ourselves; but at the end of the day everyone writes their own story. There have never been two identical outcomes in the world. Everyone’s is different. So the only thing that’s left is passion. If you’re not passionate about your journey, it won’t work. You can try convincing yourself that you want to do something as much as you want, but if you don’t actually feel and understand the reasons behind it, it’s not worth pursuing. You’ll always end up finding that one passion. The one that’s worth the battle, the one that’ll make you sink all your sweat and blood into it. And when you do discover it, you’ll just know. That’s what all of this has taught me because I finally found mine.

http://www.borntofall.com

Photographer: Easton Schirra (link to http://www.eastonschirra.com)

Styling: Wilford Lenov

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    A Conversation with ‘FALL’ Founder & Designer Jeremy Fall A little over two years ago when WeTheUrban was in its...
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